Programs

Course Descriptions

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY I (828, 829)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
This course is designed for the student interested in understanding, maintaining, and performing minor and major repairs to their vehicles. The course is 65% practical experience and 35% theory. The classroom activities include the integration of math, reading, communication, logical thinking, and teamwork. Lab activities include identification of tools, removal and installation of parts, and the systematic diagnosis of automobiles. Most major systems of a vehicle will be studied. The student will be expected to develop good habits in the areas of work ethic, cooperation, attendance, attitude, leadership, and organization. Completion of pre-algebra, small gas engines, basic autos, and electricity is highly recommended.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY II (830, 831)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: C or better in Auto I is recommended
This course prepares a student for an entry-level position in the field of auto repair or additional schooling. Presentations are made by colleges, trade school representatives, and other guest speakers. Classroom activities include group projects, individual critical thinking activities, and study materials used by ASE (Automotive Service Excellence). Lab activities include a challenging list of automotive repair items.
Some students will repair their own vehicles. This course is 50% theory and 50% practical experience. *This course has been articulated with one or more community colleges.
CONSTRUCTION TRADES I (800, 801)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
Construction Trades I is designed to give the beginning student an opportunity to develop knowledge of and skills in the use of basic hand and power tools, materials, processes, safety, and other related items associated with the construction industry. The student will be expected to develop good habits in the areas of work ethics, cooperation, attendance, attitude, leadership, and dependability. Students will have experiences in building a house including concrete work and masonry when applicable, rough and finish carpentry, drywall application and finishing, hardwood flooring, ceramic tile, Corian® fabrication and installation, painting and decorating if contracted, and landscaping if time allows. Related instruction will be given in site selection and development, building codes and ordinances, blueprint reading, measurement and related math, trade terminology, materials application, occupational information, and safety.
CONSTRUCTION TRADES II (802, 803)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Construction Trades I
Construction Trade II students will be considered experienced and will be expected to advance their skills and knowledge to an employable level. More responsibility will be placed upon these students, and they will be given the opportunity to develop leadership traits to their maximum as foremen or crew leaders. See Construction Trades I for specific course content.  *This course has been articulated with one or more area community colleges.
COMMERCIAL ART I (856, 857)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to give students basic knowledge of the wide variety of visual arts careers possible and to provide them with an introduction to the skills that these visual arts careers require to be successful. Instruction is geared to a wide variety of learning experiences including basic and advanced art skills in drawing, composition, design concepts, color and art production. Students also work with black and white photography, digital imaging with still and video cameras, and computer applications in both PC and Mac platforms. Programs include Photoshop, Illustrator, and QuarkXpress. Many practical assignments are done in these areas. Students are encouraged to research career areas and schools and to take slides for applications and scholarships.
COMMERCIAL ART II (858, 859)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Commercial Art I
This course is for the student who is seriously committed to a career in the visual arts. Students spend many hours developing their skills in drawing, design, and color using a wide variety of media. The student will have additional experience in photography, digital photography, digital video, and the use of Photoshop, Illustrator and QuarkXPress. The students will organize their portfolio and take slides of their work for applications and scholarships. Students will also have the opportunity for independent work in an area of interest.
DRAFTING/CAD I (814, 815)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
This course prepares students for careers in mechanical and arthitectural drafting.  During the first semester, students will be introduced to the fundamental of mechanical drafting as well as in-depth experience with AutoCAD LT 2004.  In the second semester students apply their skills to understand the techniques involved in arthitectural drafting.  Throughout the year students will have the opportunity to meet professionals in the field, create a portfolio, tour colleges, and develop their own house.
DRAFTING/CAD II (816, 817)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Drafting/CAD I
This course is designed to further develop the student’s skills in mechanical and arthitectural drafting.  The first semester expands the students’ knowledge and experience in mechanical drawing with geometric dimension and tolerance, auxiliary views and 3D modeling.  The second semester is focused on expanding the knowledge of architectural design through structure design, surveying and construction techniques.  Throughout the year students will have the opportunity to meet professionals in the field, create a portfolio, tour colleges, and construct their own house.*This course has been articulated with one or more community colleges.
ELECTRONICS I (822, 823)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
Basic electrical concepts begin the first semester of Electronics I. This course covers basic electronics circuits, power supplies, amplifiers, and communication circuitry. A variety of learning experiences are used, including hands on circuit construction, computer software representation, and lecture/demonstration. A unit in residential wiring is included. The student will participate in wiring the project house built by construction trades.
ELECTRONICS II (824, 825)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Electronics I
This course includes additional work in communication circuitry. Radio, television, and computers are emphasized. Study of logic circuits and troubleshooting and repair of electronic equipment is also included.  *This course has been articulated with one or more community coyleges.
CHILD CARE I (880, 881)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
This course presents the history and philosophy of early childhood education. Areas of development from birth through age 5 are covered. Curriculum styles and observations methods are introduced and practiced. Students prepare for operation of a lab preschool. Career interests and opportunities are covered.
CHILD CARE II (882, 883)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Child Care I
This course focuses on the entrepreneurial aspects of operating/owning a child care business. Students will experience planning, budgeting, staffing, and operating a child care center such as a nursery school or home day care center. Students in good standing often intern at local early childhood sites.  *This course has been articulated with one or more area community colleges
FOOD SERVICE I (890, 891)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
This course consists of theory and laboratory work relating to the planning, selecting, purchasing, preparing, and serving of foods. Included is the study of nutritional values, processing, quantity cooking, storing equipment, sanitation, and management. Instruction is geared to prepare students for entry into such occupations as baker, chef, cook or in services such as bus boy, waiter, or waitress. Students develop skills in quantity cookery by practical experience on extended campus twice a week working in the community at local restaurants and nursing homes getting hands-on experience in preparation skills.
FOOD SERVICE II (892, 893)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Food Service I
This is a “hands on” course in which management and preparation skills are learned. It is more advanced than the first year in that many of the tasks are learned on an individual basis. Students work in the school cafeteria as well as on extended campus twice a week. Areas to be covered are meats, poultry, fish, soups, gravies, and desserts.
HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY-EMT-BASIC (864, 865)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
This course will introduce the care and handling of the critically ill and injured. Emphasis is on the development of skills in assessment of illnesses and the application of proper emergency care procedures. This course will meet federal and state guidelines for basic EMT training, and students who successfully complete this course will be able to take the Illinois State or National Registry EMT-Basic licensure exam.
HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY-CNA (870, 871)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
This course provides learning experiences designed for the student who is interested in the para-medical field. Classroom instruction, related laboratory experiences, and procedures for patient care are included. This is supplemented with experience gained through extended off-campus observation and actual job performance at OSF St. James-John W. Albrecht Medical Center, nursing homes, doctor and dental offices, and other medical businesses. Upon completing the course, the student will have a realistic understanding of the health field and qualify for entry level employment as any kind of para-medical aide or additional training in the chosen occupational area. Students who successfully complete certain course requirements will be eligible to register for the written exam to become Certified Nurse Assistants in the State of Illinois. Completion of Introduction to Health Science Technology is recommended.  *This course has been articulated with one or more community colleges.
WELDING I & II (850, 851, 852, 853)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Metals I or consent of instructor
Welding Iis designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills of both the procedures and techniques associated with welding. Upon successful completion of this program, the student will be able to demonstrate those necessary skills, both cognitive and manipulative, so that he may obtain entry level employment in this field. The first year program introduces the basic skills and techniques required to work safely and efficiently with the various tools associated with welding. The types of welding introduced are OAW, SMAW, and GMAW.
Welding II is a more intense study and practice of the techniques learned from the first year. New procedures and processes such as GTAW and certification testing will be introduced.
*This course has been articulated with one or more area community colleges.
LAW ENFORCEMENT I (872, 873)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
Law Enforcement I is an introductory course designed to prepare students for a career in law enforcement. Students will be introduced to the history of law enforcement and the advancements in this ever-changing field. Instruction will also include questioning procedures, legal rights, examination of routine police procedures, criminal investigation, pursuits and arrests. Students will have the opportunity to meet professionals in the field, participate in simulated scenarios, demonstrations, and tour law enforcement sites.
LAW ENFORCEMENT II (874, 875)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Law Enforcement I
This course continues the exploration of law enforcement. Students will participate in an extended campus job shadowing experience with many local law enforcement agencies including careers in police work, telecommunications, corrections, and probation. Students will be introduced to patrol techniques, field operations, communication procedures, criminal investigation, and forensic science. Professionals in the field will be brought in to share their insights and expertise.  *This course has been articulated with one or more community colleges.
OFFICE INFORMATION PROCESSING I (876, 877)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Keyboarding
Office Information Processing prepares students for entry-level careers in the office field. Students will be oriented to business office skills and essential work attitudes and ethics to become successful and productive employees. The latest technology is utilized with a Windows-based operating system. Word processing and desktop publishing applications are taught utilizing Microsoft Office software. Units on values and setting goals, learning styles, human relations, self-esteem, positive attitude, conflict resolution, listening, teamwork, and handling stress will be integrated throughout the course. A workbook on proofreading and Working Smart are used throughout the course. Activities involving communication skills, records management, mail procedures, telecommunications, desktop business machines, business etiquette/dress, internet etiquette, and sexual harassment will also be included. Field trips and guest speakers from various businesses and post-secondary institutions will be invited to speak about employment and education opportunities and business needs. Each student will then develop a portfolio of employment forms.
OFFICE INFORMATION PROCESSSING II (878, 879)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Office Information Processing I
The second year of this program stresses employment opportunities and advanced office skills. Students again work in an office environment, and along with enhancing their business skills, work for individuals on various business assignments and the school newspaper.  *This course has been articulated with one or more area community colleges.
COMPUTER INFORMATION PROCESSING I (910, 911)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Keyboarding
Computer Information Processing prepares students for entry-level careers in the computer field. Students will be oriented to computer skills and essential work attitudes and ethics to become successful and productive employees. The latest technology is utilized with a Windows-based operating system. Word processing, data base, spreadsheet, and desktop publishing applications are taught utilizing Microsoft Office software. Units on values and setting goals, learning styles, human relations, self-esteem, positive attitude, conflict resolution, listening, teamwork, and handling stress will be integrated throughout the course. A workbook on proofreading and Working Smart are used throughout the course. Activities involving communication skills, records management, mail procedures, telecommunications, business etiquette/dress, internet etiquette, and sexual harassment will also be included. Field trips and guest speakers from various businesses and post-secondary institutions will be invited to speak about employment and education opportunities and needs. Each student will develop a portfolio of employment forms. This course will culminate with a business simulation where self-paced, individual work is stressed and encouraged and each student develops his own business forms, job descriptions, personnel forms, and other business-related documents.
COMPUTER INFORMATION PROCESSING II (912, 913)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Computer Information Processing I
The second year of this program stresses employment opportunities and advanced computer skills. Students again work in an office environment and along with enhancing their business skills, work for individuals on various business assignments and the school newspaper.
*This course has been articulated with one or more area community colleges.
COMPUTER MAINTENANCE I (806, 807)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: None
The first of a 2 year program, this course provides instruction in the area of maintenance and repair of computer and computer-related equipment. The course is designed to teach students the newest PC technologies within the framework of the PC’s overall evolution, while also preparing them for industry endorsed exams. Students will also receive some instruction on installing and servicing networks, repairing or replacing faulty mechanical or electronic parts, and giving technical advice on ways to keep equipment in good operating condition. A solid foundation of theory on how a computer and other peripherals work is covered. Customer service, work orders, and technical reports will be reviewed in detail and practical experience will be utilized. The development of employability skills, transition skills, and vocational ethics will be included. Students will complete a 50 hour internship at a local school or business.  *Articulation pending.
COMPUTER MAINTENANCE II (808, 809)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: C or better in Computer Maintenance I is recommended
The second year provides instruction in the area of computer operating systems and software hardware interactions. The course is designed to teach students the newest PC technologies within the framework of the PC’s overall evolution while also preparing them for industry endorsed exams. Students will also receive some instruction on configuring network workstations and software installations and upgrades. Customer service, work orders, and technical reports will be reviewed in detail and practical experience will be utilized. The development of employability skills, transition skills, and vocational ethics will be included. Students will complete a 50 hour internship at a local school or business.  *Articulation pending.
COMPUTER NETWORKING I (810, 811)
Class Level: 11, 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Geometry or Administrative Consent
The first year of a 2 year program, the Cisco Networking Academy is designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Instruction includes, safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, network standards, LANs, WANs, cabling, cabling tools, routers, router programming, topologies and IP addressing. Particular emphasis is given to the use of decision-making and problem-solving techniques in applying science, mathematics, communication, and social studies concepts to solve networking problems.
COMPUTER NETWORKING II (812, 813)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 2 Prerequisite: Computer Networking I
The second year of the Cisco Networking Academy is designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology. Instruction included network terminology and protocols, network standards, and advanced router configuranions including multiple types of WAN applications and designs. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to pursue the Cisco Certified Networking Associates certification (CCNA) as well as the opportunity to enter the workforce or purse their education and training in the networking field.  *This course has been articulated with one or more community colleges.
INTER-RELATED COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (920, 921, 930, 931)
Class Level: 12 Credit: 3 Prerequisite: Senior status
This course is designed to help students bridge the gap between school and the world of work. The course includes making decisions about the work place, entering the work force, the individual as a worker, and making financial decisions. Students also study different types of training, completing job resumes, applying for jobs, working with others, using credit, and buying insurance. The purpose of this course is twofold; students are provided practical work experience while still in high school and gain practical experience in applying for and interviewing for jobs. This work experience provides on-the-job training in the career area of the student’s choice. The students will take regularly scheduled classes part of the day and a co-op work experience the other part of the day totaling a minimum of 15 hours per week. Students must apply through the LAVC and will be interviewed.
SUGGESTED CURRICULA
For Employment or the Career Oriented Student
Students who are planning to enter the job market immediately after high school or attend some vocational training program have a wide selection of courses open to them. The student would first of all identify the area most appropriate to him/her–industrial arts, secretarial, home economics, etc.–and begin a program directed toward that area. Courses in industrial arts–woods, metals, electricity–will prepare the student either for further training after high school or, if taken during the freshman or sophomore year, for further training at the Livingston Area Vocational Center.
Other courses suggested for such a student would be pre-algebra through geometry or above, science, and possibly typing and business law. Since this student plans little or no schooling after high school, he also should take as many humanistic courses as practicable–literature, psychology, sociology–since high school will be his last opportunity for such experiences.
The student who by his junior year has determined his interest should investigate entering the LACC for directed training in an area of his choice. This training prepares him/her for the job market and will put him several steps ahead of his less-trained job-seeking friends.
Articulation Agreements
Livingston Area Career Center has been working with the area community colleges to establish articulation agreements that will allow students to earn college credit while still in high school. Pontiac High School is primarily served by three community colleges. Odell residents attend Joliet Junior College and Saunemin residents attend Kankakee Community College. All other students attend Heartland Community College. Other community colleges within our area include Parkland Community College, Illinois Valley Community College, and Illinois Central College.In general, to take advantage of the articulated programs, students must enroll in their community college within a minimum time frame, usually two years after high school graduation; maintain certain minimum grade point averages in high school work; and be able to pass the next level course at college with a minimum grade of C or better. Each college has specific guidelines that are subject to change. Interested students should contact LAVC to receive current requirements. Depending on the program, students currently can earn from two to twelve credit hours when they meet all the necessary requirements. Articulation agreements are continually updated and new programs are being added each year. Contact the LAVC office to obtain the most current information.